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The Heart of the Matter

In honor of Heart Month, our cardiovascular experts share why they’re committed to fighting heart disease and improving public health.

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anatomical heart in blue on red background

When you think of February, red Valentine hearts probably come to mind. But at CSL Behring, the hearts we’re thinking of are beating ones with valves and four chambers.  

That’s because February is American Heart Month. It’s a time when the global cardiovascular community steps back and recognizes the importance of heart health. One statistic says it all: Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease, is the number one killer in the world.

However, it’s also preventable and that’s what American Heart Month is all about. February is prime time to raise awareness about how diet, exercise and lifestyle can keep your heart healthy. And yet, despite all the awareness-raising and advancements, heart disease remains a formidable health threat.

Here at CSL Behring, we’re doing our part to reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease on public health. For the past several years, we’ve been conducting extensive research and working toward new treatments. Learn about the work CSL Behring is doing in cardiovascular and metabolic disease.

For many on our team, this commitment to better cardiovascular care is personal. 

“American Heart Month reminds me why I chose a career in cardiology in the first place,” said Dr. Danielle Duffy, Senior Director of Clinical Research and Development of Cardiovascular and Metabolism at CSL Behring. “In fact, my experience working with patients and seeing the devastating effects of heart disease firsthand, especially in women, motivated me to get involved with my local American Heart Association chapter.”

For Dr. Larry Deckelbaum, it’s about keeping the spirit of Heart Month all year long.

“Each day we’re working to help reduce the impact of heart disease around the globe, investing in new research and breakthrough therapies. Even though there’s so much more work to be done, we remain committed to the challenge,” said Deckelbaum, a cardiologist and CSL Behring’s Vice President, Research and Development, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Therapeutic Area.

To learn more, check out the American Heart Association website for tips on living a heart-healthy lifestyle.